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Legacy Wear

Items 1 to 10 of 32 total

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  1. Baldwin Locomotive Works

    Transforming Transportation, Linking the Nation

    In 1876, the Baldwin Locomotive Works of Philadelphia led the nation in producing steam locomotives. The firm built 232 engines in that centennial year. The most noted was the Jupiter, now housed in the Smithsonian. It was shipped to California on a heavy flatcar and became part of the revolution in transportation that tied the nation together, the far-flung but still United States.

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  2. Bluebonnet, Betsy, Bowie

    Iconic Texas

    Two American heroes, David Crockett and Jim Bowie, died in Texas defending the Alamo. Crockett’s gun, Old Betsy is enshrined there. Jim Bowie’s iconic knife had a resurgence of popularity in the 1950s when movies celebrated these heroes. Texas adopted the Bluebonnet as the state flower by Texas in 1901. Scattered in fields and along roadsides in Central and South Texas it blooms in early spring and resembles a woman’s sunbonnet.

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  3. Captain John Ericsson

    "Oh Give Us a Navy of Iron"

    During the Civil War, Captain John Ericsson rendered wooden naval vessels obsolete with his revolutionary vessel the U.S.S. Monitor. In 1862 D. Brainerd Williamson and James Porter honored Ericsson’s contribution with a prophetic ballad: “O give us a Navy of Iron, And to man it our Yankee Lads; And we'll conquer the world's broad oceans, With our Navy of Iron clads.”

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  4. Carolina’s Lords Proprietors

    Constitutional Government

    In 1663 Charles II granted eight men, the Lords Proprietors, a large slice of North America to finance, develop, and to rule. Lord Ashley, the most notable of the group, specified the street plan for a new city. He also had his secretary, the philosopher John Locke, write the Fundamental Constitution of Carolina. The elephant had become a significant icon in England by the late 1600’s but there is some mystery about its association with Carolina coinage.

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  5. Confederate General

    Cold Steel Armistead

    The Civil War drama revealed tragic and heroic events at Gettysburg. During Pickett’s charge, Brigadier General Lewis Armistead led a Confederate force across a quarter-mile field to breach a stone wall juncture called the Angle. Armistead rallied his troops, shouting “Let's give them the cold steel.” He skewered his hat on the point of his sword for all to see. Two-thirds of his men were casualties. As he crossed the wall, Armistead was shot three times. He died, but his wounded friend, General Winfield Scott Hancock, survived to fight on—for the Union.

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  6. Defense of the St. Louis Arsenal

    Hartford’s tribute to Nathaniel Lyon

    Nathaniel Lyon of Connecticut was the first Union general to die on the field of battle in the Civil War. Assigned to protect the St. Louis Arsenal in Missouri in 1861, Lyon was met by Confederates at Wilson’s Creek. Despite a serious wound to his leg and a bullet grazing his head, Lyon regrouped and led his troops. Shot in the chest at close range, he fell from his horse and died. His is honored as the “Savior of Missouri.” Nathaniel Lyon of Connecticut, serving the Union in Missouri, disguised himself as a farm woman and entered the state guards’ camp. Learning that the pro-Confederate governor intended to seize the St. Louis arsenal, he recruited the St. Louis Wide Awakes to secretly ship the arms to Illinois. Called “Savior of Missouri,” Lyon was buried in Hartford, Connecticut.

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  7. Defiance Cannon Ball 13

    Bunker Hill

    Far overmatched by British forces, colonial militiamen often rallied with acts of defiance. Perhaps Sgt. Nathan Blood, atop Breed’s Hill, chiseled a “13” for colonial unity on the face of one 6 lb. cannonball destined to crash through the superior numbers in British lines. Sgt. Blood fell on that field under William Prescott’s command, June 17, 1775. In the 1751 copy of the Pennsylvania Gazette Benjamin Franklin first used the rattlesnake in a satirical comic commanding readers to "Join or Die." The rattlesnake representing the 13 Colonies appears in the background here in a tribute to America's first published political cartoon. Later the rattlesnake finds its way onto the Gadsen flag with those famous words emblazoned; "Don't Tread On Me!”

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  8. Duke of Cumberland

    Acts of defiance

    Taverns hosted forums for citizen action across the colonies. Many taverns evoked a spirit of connection with the British before tension in the colonies grew. Patriots, inflamed by British repression, often discharged their anger and weapons at common British symbols. Five musket balls slammed into one such symbol, the popular Duke of Cumberland Tavern sign, leaving it with the holes as a reminder.

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  9. Frederick Douglass

    Forerunner of Freedom

    Frederick Douglass was born a slave. Everything else about this remarkable man was extraordinary. He taught himself to read, escaped from Baltimore, Maryland, became a leader in the anti-slavery movement, advised President Lincoln and Johnson, lectured to thousands, spoke up for women's rights, became an ambassador, and wrote an autobiography that eloquently described his life in slavery and his life as a free man. A leading intellectual of his day, Douglass refused to compromise on rights and justice.

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  10. George Washington

    Duty, Service, Honor

    History is replete with scoundrels bent on villainy who claim the mantle of revolutionary. Few meet with the honor that attends our Nation's First Revolutionary. The myths about Washington multiplied after his death. No doubt he would have been embarrassed by the adulation. Beginning when he was miraculously spared during an ambush in the French and Indian War, George Washington believed that Providence had preserved him for a larger purpose—one that he carried out completely before gracefully retiring to his farm.

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Items 1 to 10 of 32 total

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