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Mens Crew

Mens Crew

Items 1 to 10 of 17 total

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  1. Boston Tea Party

    Tipping Point Tax

    The Tea Act met resistance throughout the colonies. American merchants refused to purchase East India Company tea because of the tax. A crowd of 5000 Bostonians met at the Old South Meeting House, resulting in hundreds of men disguising themselves with soot and blankets to throw about a million-dollars’ worth of tea into the harbor. Boston became the focus of Parliament’s outrage. The War of Independence would start in Massachusetts.

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  2. Bradford & Squanto

    Confederacy

    Hunted, fleeting, courageous families established a foothold in the hard New World. More than half the Pilgrims died in the first winter at Plymouth. The rest survived providentially. Squanto, a local Indian who had returned from England after being kidnapped, taught them how to plant corn. A bond formed, Governor Bradford and Massasoit, the nearby chief, signed a lasting treaty of peace and mutual security.

     

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  3. Breaking the Code

    Samuel's Telegraph

    Samuel F. Morse tested and built the sensational telegraph and its code in 1844. 'What Hath God Wrought?" the first telegraph message, travelled 80 miles roundtrip from the Supreme Court to Baltimore and back. Morse planted the seeds of a world wide web of communication. Telegraphy helped inter-connect vast regions with copper wire and exponentially advanced communications.

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  4. Crown & Thistle Tavern

    Honoring St. Patrick's Day

    America’s diversity has been unique in the world from colonial times to the present. In 1737, Irish colonists first celebrated St. Patrick’s Day in Boston. New York City’s Irish initiated their celebration at the Crown & Thistle Tavern in 1756. General George Washington, commander of a large number of Irish volunteers, gave them a day off on March 17, 1780.

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  5. Forever Free 36˚ 30’

    Head West with the Underground

    Americans embodied the spirit of the buffalo and headed west while power-house Henry Clay steered the Missouri Compromise through Congress in 1820, extending Missouri westward. Except for Missouri, all U.S. territory north of 36˚ 30’ would be forever free of slavery. That slogan fueled western expansion and Popular Sovereignty replaced the Compromise in the 1850s. Slavery north of 36˚ 30’ failed to materialize.

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  6. Frederick Douglass

    Forerunner of Freedom

    Frederick Douglass was born a slave. Everything else about this remarkable man was extraordinary. He taught himself to read, escaped from Baltimore, Maryland, became a leader in the anti-slavery movement, advised President Lincoln and Johnson, lectured to thousands, spoke up for women's rights, became an ambassador, and wrote an autobiography that eloquently described his life in slavery and his life as a free man. A leading intellectual of his day, Douglass refused to compromise on rights and justice.

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  7. George Washington

    Duty, Service, Honor

    History is replete with scoundrels bent on villainy who claim the mantle of revolutionary. Few meet with the honor that attends our Nation's First Revolutionary. The myths about Washington multiplied after his death. No doubt he would have been embarrassed by the adulation. Beginning when he was miraculously spared during an ambush in the French and Indian War, George Washington believed that Providence had preserved him for a larger purpose—one that he carried out completely before gracefully retiring to his farm.

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  8. Green Dragon Tavern

    Underground Headquarters

    Taverns were the center of reading and conversation in colonial days. So, it was inevitable that taverns would be centers of patriot activities in the American Revolution. The Green Dragon became a favorite rendezvous for the Sons of Liberty as they plotted resistance in Boston. Here they organized and cooperated with underground organizations from New York to Virginia.

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  9. Know Our Past, Defend Liberty

    Historically Yours,

    Thirteen separate colonies took Franklin’s advice and decided to hang together as One Nation. The American Revolution launched it, the Constitution sealed it, and the democratic process has maintained it through many perilous times.

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  10. OSS Commandos

    La Jeune Fille En Fleur

    The Office of Strategic Services coordinated all American intelligence and commando operations in World War II. The OSS relied heavily on British training and assistance, and the Brits referred to untrained Americans as La Jeune En Fille (young girls in flower). The OSS, a forerunner of the CIA, adopted the rose, an ancient Greek and Roman symbol of secrecy, for its clandestine organizations. Operation Jedburgh paratroopers trained guerilla networks in Occupied France. OSS commandos used the Sykes and Fairbairn dagger in close combat, and some used the first SCUBA gear.

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